Keynote Motion Graphic Experiment

I was experimenting with Keynote's animation tools and decided for fun to make a short animated motion graphic to showcase what the app can do. It's pretty impressive how much Keynote can stand up to pro animation apps like After Effects and Motion and how fast it makes process. Honestly the most time consuming part of this was trying to get an adequate screen recording (video codecs blah).

I've always been a huge advocate of using Keynote for basic prototyping because there are a lot of great animation/drawing goodies hidden in this app and it's so easy to set a scene up. Same thing goes with motion graphics. Even if you're not planning on making your final animation in Keynote, it's an incredibly fast way to audition different effects and narratives.

The available animations may seem basic, but they can get you through most situations. I primarily used default Keynote transitions for this video and very rarely had to set up custom animation paths. Using the Magic Move feature and some clever masking can get you through most complex transitions. Here are some tips for making your own motion piece:

Keynote doesn't let you change the anchor point of an animation (like rotating around a point), but by adding in some invisible shapes you can achieve that same effect.

Keynote doesn't let you change the anchor point of an animation (like rotating around a point), but by adding in some invisible shapes you can achieve that same effect.

There's also the ability to subtract, unite, intersect, and exclude shapes. This makes custom shapes much easier so you don't have to rely on masks. You can find these options hidden in the Format > Shapes and Lines menu.

There's also the ability to subtract, unite, intersect, and exclude shapes. This makes custom shapes much easier so you don't have to rely on masks. You can find these options hidden in the Format > Shapes and Lines menu.

One last lesser-known tip is that there's a "Make Motion Path from Shape" feature so you can draw out a complex path for a shape to follow without needing to commit to the animation first.

One last lesser-known tip is that there's a "Make Motion Path from Shape" feature so you can draw out a complex path for a shape to follow without needing to commit to the animation first.